juliamhammond

Airports

To recline or not to recline?

That is the question that has provoked a storm of impassioned comments this week after the Telegraph announced that British Airways was introducing 35 new planes on its short haul routes with non-reclining seats.  Here’s the original article:

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2018/01/07/british-airways-passengers-will-no-longer-able-recline-relax/

The ensuing headlines screamed that BA was fast turning into a low-cost carrier, but that’s not what people have been arguing about.  A survey by Skyscanner in 2013 claimed that 91% were in favour of banning reclining seats on short haul flights:

https://www.skyscanner.net/news/calling-time-reclined-airline-seats

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Reclining seats on long haul planes are a boon, particularly on overnighters.  Economy class is cramped, and let’s face it, we’d all happily upgrade if funds permitted.  But for many of us, the choice is to fly economy or not fly at all, so we fold up our legs and get on with it.  It’s one of the few times when I wish I was young again.  The ability of millennials to tuck themselves up and nod off to sleep for eight straight hours is something I now struggle to achieve in a full sized double, let alone a tiny aeroplane seat.

But that whole cramped arrangement gets a whole lot worse when someone in front reclines their seat into the space in front of my knees.  I’m not especially tall, but I do have long legs, so a battering to the kneecaps is a real possibility.  I pity 6 footers.  I read this week that one man was left with bleeding knees after someone reclined without warning.  It’s all very well saying that you have the right to use the space – after all, you’ve paid for that seat, recline and all – but if someone is going to get hurt in the process, surely there’s room for some give and take?

In the States, planes have even been forced to divert over legroom wars.  This report from the Telegraph written in 2014 refers to the Knee Defender, a product that’s still on sale, as the trigger for an air rage incident that necessitated an unscheduled landing.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/aviation/11064259/Knee-defender-causing-chaos-on-flights.html

Surely it’s better to put up with a bit of discomfort than to have your travel plans severely disrupted – and even face charges?  It’s a shared space; there has to be a bit of give and take.  I don’t expect someone to turn round and ask my permission to recline, but but I do appreciate it when they do so slowly so I have chance to grab my drink and rearrange my legs first.  Likewise, while it’s perfectly OK in my book to recline on a long haul flight, I don’t expect to be eating my meal with no space for a tray table and so always ask the flight attendant to have a word with the person in front if they haven’t yet reclined.

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But on short haul flights, is it really even necessary to have the facility to recline?  Perhaps I’ve been conditioned after years of flying with Ryanair, but I just don’t even think about it on a short flight.  I’m hopping over to Amsterdam this month and there’ll barely be enough time to sit down, let alone recline.  Even on the longest short haul flights of around four hours, it’s not really a hardship to sit up straight.  If I’m stiff, I can walk around the cabin to stretch my legs.  However, for those hubbing through Heathrow, they’ve already come off one flight and don’t need the discomfort of a cramped second leg.

So this news isn’t a deal breaker for my relationship with BA.  And of course, no one’s forcing anyone to fly BA.  You can choose not to do so and opt for a different carrier.  That said, you probably won’t find yourself sat next to me on BA any time soon, not least on one of their short haul routes.  It’s not the cull on free food or even the IT disasters that have left passengers stranded.  No, it’s price.  The budgets are still usually cheaper, even more so for me when I factor in the additional cost of getting to Heathrow over Stansted.

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But for those banging on about reclining seats, well, I think it’s the shape of things to come.  Airlines have been forced to change to stay in business.  The rise and continued popularity of the low cost carriers prove that people are happy to unpackage their fares and pay only for what they need.  I think BA’s making a smart decision to ditch the reclining seats and make room for additional paying passengers.  But will you be one of them?


Border control queues in Europe – and how to beat them

Today’s news has been full of horror stories of British travellers caught up in excessive queues at some of Europe’s busiest airports.  If you haven’t seen it, try this article from the BBC:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-40824027

Sadly, though changes in legislation have worsened the situation, it’s nothing new. Miss your flight, and you’ll find the airline and the airport pass the blame back and forth, leaving you frustrated and potentially out of pocket. So what can you do?

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Take out a decent insurance policy

Many travel insurance policies will cover you for missed departures, but check the small print in case there are any exclusions. Also check the amount covered – and work out whether this is going to be sufficient to cover a night in a hotel and the cost of a replacement flight.

Get to the airport early – and don’t wait for your gate number to be displayed

Queues for security are going to be lengthy in peak summer season, so you should be aiming to get to the airport in plenty of the time regardless. But once you’re through security, you need to go through passport control too. In some airports, this can be tucked away in a quiet wing of the airport serving just a few gates.

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If your gate isn’t displayed early, by the time you start to line up, you may have cut it too fine. I almost missed a flight from Malaga to London a couple of years ago for this very reason – so don’t risk having to be very un-British and queue jump like I did. And if I pushed in front of you and you’re reading this, I’m very sorry – and hope you made your flight too!

My advice is to go through passport control even if your gate isn’t displayed on the boards – if there are multiple passport controls, in my experience the border control officials will redirect you. Just look suitably apologetic as I did and make sure you head off in the right direction.

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Consider booking a package

If you book a package holiday with an operator with has its own fleet of planes, such as Thomson (other operators are available!), then the same company is responsible for getting you from the hotel to the airport and from the airport to Britain. At the very least this is going to reduce the buck-passing.

Have you any tales to tell? I’d love to hear your experiences.