juliamhammond

What to do if you’re impacted by Ryanair’s cancellations

If you’re affected by Ryanair’s announcement that they are cancelling many hundreds of flights over the next six weeks, you’re going to need to know your rights.  This is how the news broke:

https://www.theguardian.com/business/2017/sep/16/ryanair-cancels-up-to-50-flights-a-day-to-improve-punctuality

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If your outbound flight has been cancelled at short notice:

First, see if you can rebook. According to Ryanair’s website, this should be possible online. People are reporting on social media that the Ryanair helplines are overwhelmed and they’re not able to complete a rebooking over the phone.  Obviously with so many people chasing so few seats at short notice, many are going to be disappointed.  So what then?

If you cannot find a satisfactory rebooking (e.g. your flight is being rebooked but so late into your holiday to make it as good as useless) then you’ll need to apply for a refund.  You may also be entitled to compensation. These are your rights under EU law if the destination is within the EU or if it’s an EU carrier like Ryanair:

Flight cancellation
Flights under 1500km – 250 euros compensation
Flights over 1500km – 400 euros compensation

Note: this only covers you if your cancellation occurs 14 days or less before your flight.  If you are due to travel in more than 14 days’ time and your flight is cancelled, this will be treated by the airline as a rebooking or rerouting.  You still have the right to cancel with a full refund of what you paid for the flights, but will not be eligible for additional compensation.

Delayed arrival whether with Ryanair or alternative carrier
Flights under 1500km – 2 hours
Flights over 1500km – 3 hours

If you are delayed, you are also entitled to food and accommodation vouchers.  Full details here:

http://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/EN/TXT/?uri=LEGISSUM:l24173

Note that it can take many months to secure this compensation, despite EU regulations stating refunds must be paid within a week.  Remember you will need to keep all receipts and boarding passes. It’s also a good idea to send letters recorded delivery if you are getting nowhere by email.

If you decide not to travel, have a look at what expenses you’ll incur, such as accommodation that cannot be cancelled at short notice.  The airline is not liable for this.  It will need to be claimed back from your travel insurance company.  Making a claim such as this doesn’t affect your right to EU compensation if applicable.

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If you’re abroad and your inbound flight has been cancelled:

The above applies but you’ll also have to factor in whether you need to be back home as a matter of urgency or can afford the time and money (up front at least) to extend your trip.  You might find it easier to  deal with staff face to face at the airport though this can add to your stress as there will be a lot of other angry passengers there which isn’t going to make you feel better.

You can try to persuade the airline that rebooking you with an alternative carrier e.g. a seat on a rival airline is a better idea.  You’ll have more bargaining power if the airline itself is very tight for space and is struggling to get you somewhere, especially if you’re stranded and they’re having to pay for your overnight accommodation.  Remember if you pay for your own alternative flights, you’re out of pocket.

It can be very hard to get them to pay, as I found out with CityJet a few years ago.  CityJet refunded their own flight (that they cancelled fifteen minutes before departure) but because I didn’t want to wait for an alternative with CityJet or spend another night in Paris even at their expense, I paid for the Eurostar alternative.  I eventually funded it out of the compensation I received eight months later.  Read the full story here:

https://juliamhammond.wordpress.com/2015/03/06/finally-a-win-against-cityjet/

If you can get through on a helpline, that is often better, but you will need to be patient.  Be as calm, polite and flexible as you can, particularly if you need to get back home in a hurry.  Remember the person on the phone isn’t directly to blame and venting your frustration isn’t going to get you anywhere.

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If you’ve a flight coming up which is currently unaffected:

This currently is where most Ryanair passengers are, fortunately, and the social media furore should calm down for the most part now that people know where they stand.  Nevertheless:

Have a Plan B.  Research alternative airlines or other means of transport on the inbound leg.  Check your email on a regular basis so that if your flight is next to be affected, you’re amongst the first to know – and fight for the seats that might be available on alternative flights.

Print out or save to your phone a copy of the EU regulations (see link above) so that there can be no dispute with airline staff about your rights – it will be in black and white.

Double check your travel insurance, especially the limits and excesses for flight delays and flight cancellations.  Again, keep all receipts and boarding passes as you’ll need them to make a claim.  Keep proof of the cancellation.

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What now?

Ryanair’s lack of consideration for their customers, though not a surprise, is still a concern.  They won’t be the first and last airline to do this.  I’ve had similar late in the day cancellations from American Airlines (weather related issues leading to a 48 hour delay in New York when I should have been in Nicaragua) and as mentioned, with CityJet (who didn’t even inform us the flight was cancelled, just checked us in as normal and quietly removed our flight from the departures board).  But for the record, Ryanair, you need to remember who keeps your staff in a job and your planes in the air.

Update 17 September from the excellent Simon Calder at The Independent:

http://www.independent.co.uk/travel/news-and-advice/ryanair-rights-400000-passengers-cancelled-flights-compensation-hotels-meals-caa-a7949916.html

Update 18 September of full list of cancellations on the Ryanair website:

https://www.ryanair.com/ie/en/useful-info/help-centre/travel-updates/flight-cancellations7

2 responses

  1. This latest dirty trick has made up my mind for me that I will never use them again. I can put up with unfair changes to terms and conditions but this is below the belt. I don’t want to go away and worry that my flight home might be cancelled. I have flights booked to Malta in October and now I have to watch my inbox for bad news.

    Liked by 1 person

    September 17, 2017 at 6:19 am

  2. My husband feels the same and refuses to fly with them, Andrew. With this latest fiasco I’m losing goodwill towards them too. Good luck with your October flights and make sure you have a backup plan for getting home.

    Like

    September 17, 2017 at 7:24 am

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