juliamhammond

Posts tagged “Thomas Cook

The end of the High Street travel agent – or is it?

News has broken today that Thomas Cook will close 21 of its High Street stores, one of which is my local branch in Colchester. It’s no surprise. Even Thomas Cook themselves admit that 64% of its UK bookings were made online last year. Their website is bright, colourful and most important of all, easy to navigate. Rationalising a business is the way to keep it afloat, and if you don’t move with the times you become a dinosaur. Thomas Cook led the way in 1841 with its pioneering railway excursions and is a respected player in the industry. Closing its stores isn’t a sign of failure, it’s a savvy move designed to help the company retain its market share.

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I haven’t stepped foot inside a travel agency for over two decades. The last time I asked about flights, the assistant hadn’t heard of the place I wanted to fly to, so I left. The rise of budget airlines and the breadth of information available at the click of a mouse means I have no need to pick up the phone and speak to a specialist, much less go to the bother of visiting a High Street store. The rise of the internet made the travel agent the middle man. Online agencies such as Expedia, originally set up by Microsoft in 1996, do a more than satisfactory job. Use an online travel agent and you’re not tied to store opening hours, but you’ll still have the convenience of a one-stop shop for your travel package and the benefit of bulk buying discounts.

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But just because I no longer use a travel agent, doesn’t mean I don’t advise others to use one. One of the benefits of the internet is also its biggest drawback – sometimes there’s just too much information. Sifting out what you need to know from the mountain of websites that Google presents can be hard. Travel’s my job – I take for granted that I know which sites will be useful and which are irrelevant to my needs. But for many, navigating through all that information is a minefield. How do you know what you’re reading isn’t misleading or downright inaccurate? Sadly there are many influencers out there who just don’t know as much as they claim to, like the blogger who presented a £1000 indirect flight from London to the US as a bargain, when direct fares are often half that amount or less. How do you whittle down which New York hotel to choose when Expedia presents almost two thousand search results?

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In the light of that, it’s not surprising that some High Street travel agents are actually expanding the number of branches. Kuoni’s one of them. Paired with John Lewis, they offer a different experience to Thomas Cook, and aim at a different clientele including the lucrative luxury honeymoon market. Their customers, they say, value quality over cost. Between 2016 and 2017, they reported a 38% increase in the number of appointments made with their in-store experts. 59% of their customers, they reveal, come in with a blank sheet and ask the consultant to help them find their perfect trip. Visit Kuoni’s website, and though you’ll find plenty of tempting images and itineraries, you can’t book them online – instead you have to telephone or book in person. Hays Travel, the UK’s largest independent travel agent, are also expanding, so the trend’s not confined to Kuoni.

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Millennials are particularly keen to utilise a travel agent, a trend that’s mirroring what’s going on across the Atlantic. FOMO – that’s the fear of missing out to those of us who are old enough to be their parents – means that they want to ensure that they book the very best when it comes to travel. According to ABTA, 59% of millennials say they’d pay extra for a holiday that’s tailormade to their preferences, good news for agents like Trailfinders with a High Street presence and a strong reputation for bespoke but affordable packages. In Kuoni’s latest worldwide trends report, it notes a rise in bookings of what’s termed “wow experiences”. From dining beside a waterfall in Thailand to staying in a vintage Airstream trailer on the Bolivian salt flats, bespoke just got interesting – and crucially, difficult to pull off without the right connections. ABTA’s annual report backs up this desire to leave the booking process to an expert. They state that 45% of those booking via a travel professional do so because of the confidence it gives them, while Google asserts that 69% of travellers return to companies offering a personalised approach.

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While hardened low-budget, intrepidly independent travellers (like me!) will stubbornly continue to find their own way, the age of High Street travel agents isn’t yet over. After all, if you’d call out a plumber to fix a water leak, why not call upon a travel professional to find you the holiday that’s right for you? It will probably cost you more, but if you think it would be worth it, then it’s money well spent.


Thomas Cook Explore the Elements competition

Looking for four suitable photos for the Thomas Cook Explore the Elements competition – find it here http://www.thomascook.com/blog/featured-posts/explore-the-elements/ – has been the perfect excuse to spend a Sunday afternoon browsing through my travel photo albums.

My entries

Fire

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This was taken a month ago in Jacmel, Haiti. The man in the photo is a houngan, or Vodou priest, who was explaining some of the rites and rituals that form his religion. I love the atmosphere that this photo conjures up, with the shadowy skull in the background that hints at dark practices. Attending a blessing ceremony later that evening was an experience I won’t forget in a hurry.

Water

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I got married last year in Iceland and the day after the wedding, my new husband and I revisited the beach at Jokulsarlon on Iceland’s south coast ten years after our first trip. Ice that has calved from the glacier is washed out to sea where these tiny icebergs slowly disintegrate. I love that this photo looks almost black and white in the sunshine.

Land

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Not being a massive sports fan, I fled to Namibia to escape the London Olympics and found myself in the Namib Desert on the evening of the opening ceremony. The sunset in this remote location was spectacular and I especially love the tree silhouette which draws the setting sun towards you as you look at it. I sat outside my tent with a cold beer until the light faded completely before repairing to the bar where ironically the Olympics was on the TV.

Air

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I found this category the most difficult. My thoughts turned to a hot air balloon trip I made a few years back in Cappadocia, Turkey. During the same trip, I had a brief stopover in Istanbul where these souvenir tins of air had caught my eye. I hope that this is valued as a unique slant on the theme. I have to add, I think the Turks could sell me anything!

My nominations

I’ve chosen to nominate people who have taken the trouble to comment on my own blog. So thank you, and good luck with your own entries.

Wilbur at http://wilburstravels.com/

Keith at https://wisepacking.wordpress.com/

Jude at https://smallbluegreenwords.wordpress.com/

Claudia at https://mermaidtravels.wordpress.com/

Ailene at http://rheacollections.com/