juliamhammond

Where did I go in 2019 and where’s next?

Once again, 2019 has been a hectic year and I’ve notched up several new countries plus plenty of revisits. In this post I’ll be looking back at some of my favourite moments from another awesome year of travelling.

January

The first trip of the year took us down to Cornwall to see family for a long weekend. To break the journey for elderly doggo, we stopped off on the way, but thanks to husband twisting his knee, we didn’t get to see Salisbury as we had hoped. Fortunately, it improved sufficiently for a couple of walks, including this one on Portwrinkle Beach before the long drive home.

Ed and Ein

February

This year’s biggest trip was the first I took: to Uganda. I spent two weeks in this fascinating but flawed East African nation. The highlights were as varied as they were numerous. I rode a horse beside the River Nile at Jinja, had some close up encounters with the entertaining chimps of Kibale Forest and saw probably the most spectacular sunrise I’ve ever witnessed in Murchison Falls National Park a few hours before helping park rangers free an elderly giraffe trapped in a snare. Visiting Love in Action’s school in Masaka gave me an insight into everyday struggles in the country.

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April

Italy’s always a pleasure to visit and in April I travelled to the far south for the first time. En route to quirky Alberobello, I stopped off in the 2019 European Capital of Culture Matera. In the sunshine, the caves of the sassi were beautifully photogenic, though they were once described as the shame of Italy. Alberobello itself didn’t disappoint. I was lucky enough to stumble upon the characterful Trulli Anti which is one of the loveliest places I’ve stayed. The only downer was the weather, but the cone-shaped dwellings were stunning even in the wet.

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May

A week off in May took me to Central Asia and the delightful country of Kyrgyzstan. Uzbekistan has been hogging the headlines, thanks to a successful change in tourism strategy, but I felt that its neighbour would be a better fit for me after watching Joanna Lumley’s excellent TV documentary. I travelled just before peak season kicked in. Snow was still thick on the ground as we crossed a mountain pass to a deserted Song Kul, but it was remote Tash Rabat, the Silk Road caravanserai at the end of an almost forgotten valley, that stole my heart.

SK

May too

A family celebration saw us heading off to Devon to a bungalow by the sea at Saunton Sands. Grandpa dog managed to get himself onto the beach, though a walk along its entire 3.5 mile length was out of the question. It felt a little odd to be going to the West Country and not continuing to Cornwall, but it was a beautiful part of the country nevertheless. Though I didn’t surf, it was fun to watch those who did.

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August

The big celebrations I’d hoped for to mark my 50th birthday had to be scaled back as our  golden retriever Einstein hit old age. No matter: Alaska will wait and in the meantime, my husband stepped up to look after things at home while I spent a few restorative days in Austria. I revisited St Johann in Tirol for some invigorating mountain hikes in the sunshine and plenty of good food. In Kitzbuhel, I was reminded how celebrity is a curious concept, when everyone bar me went wild for a folk singer who was big in Austria – but a complete unknown over here in the UK.

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August – just!

A few days after I returned, we set off, dogs and all, for a week in Gloucestershire, staying in a log cabin in the Forest of Dean. Champagne in our own private hot tub – with two black noses pinned to the glass watching us – marked the Big 5-0. But being able to make a few excursions with Einstein (and Edison of course) was the best birthday present I could have hoped for. We enjoyed a steam railway, a trip to a castle and best of all the spectacular view from Symonds Yat.

Yat

September

The Lithuanian Coast was the much anticipated destination for September, on a press trip with the British Guild of Travel Writers. It had been many years since my first trip to this Baltic country and I was keen to visit some more. Our guide was an absolute gem, feeding us excellent food, informing and entertaining in equal measure as we toured her region and generally giving us a trip we could remember. The highlight for me was our stay on the Curonian Spit, a blend of culture and natural beauty worthy of its UNESCO World Heritage status.

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October

It was back to Italy this month, this time a second visit to Bologna, ostensibly so I could visit San Marino to bump the country count to a nicely rounded 120. I was hosted on an excellent food tour of the Quadrilatero which introduced me to a characterful bar I’d missed the first time round, the Osteria del Sole and the delights of Pignoletto, a fizz not unlike Prosecco. San Marino was very pretty and I was blessed with plenty of sunshine as I explored the cobbled streets of its hilly capital city. There was surprisingly lots to do and I’d be tempted to go back one day.

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November

The trip that almost didn’t happen, thanks to Edison’s (successful) attempt to destroy my passport, was to Italy. This time I spent a few days in Lombardy, but not to Milan. Instead, flying into Bergamo with Ryanair, I explored Mantova, Cremona, Pavia, Crespi d’Adda, Vigevano and more with the hardworking Isabella from Lombardy Tourism and her cheerful driver Luca. It’s a region that, despite being so well connected, is still off the beaten tourist trail and one that rewards with crowd-free sightseeing and good food.

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More from November

Rounding off November was a return visit to Fes in Morocco, the first with my new passport. I stayed in a sumptuous riad in the heart of the medina, near to Place Seffarine, which had been lovingly restored by its architect owner. The old town of Fes was almost exactly as I remembered it from my first visit in 1997. Although some areas of the souks had been smartened up, you still had to listen out for the clatter of horse’s hooves and donkeys hurtling through the narrow alleys with heavy loads. The smell of the tannery hadn’t improved either. New to me was the blue city of Chefchaouen, which was a pleasant place to spend the day.

Chef

December

The last trip of the year, as has become my custom, was to a Christmas market. This year’s choice was the northern German town of Bremen, a city I’d enjoyed twice before. Despite the rain, a mug of Gluhwein and the German sense of humour in the form of a bird feeder tagged “Cat cinema” got me in the Christmas mood.

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So what does 2020 have in store?

For the first time in a very long time, I have no trips booked. I have a few ideas, but nothing firmed up. It probably has a lot to do with Einstein; as his back legs weaken I know I don’t want to be away when the time comes, so last minute bookings juggled with my husband’s work commitments seem the way to go. I’m not complaining; that’s what you sign up for if you have a dog.

Ein

When I do give the new passport an airing, I think Bergamo is on the cards, if only for a day trip. Further afield, I’m keen to visit Tajikistan after such a wonderful trip to Kyrgyzstan in May. Sao Tome & Principe, Comoros, Rwanda and Madagascar are also high up on the bucket list as are Andorra and Belarus, the only two European destinations I’ve never visited. To the west, a return visit to Peru to explore the central cordillera would be the stuff of dreams, as would trips to Alaska and Hawaii.

What trips have you got planned for 2020?

3 responses

  1. As always, I’m a bit jealous that you have easy access to Europe and can plan last minute trips with budget airlines! I guess I could do the same in Asia, but having spent so much travelling around this region I’m more interested in exploring other parts of the world that I haven’t spent much time in (for the time being anyway). That said, this year was a big travel one for me. I usually only visit 1-3 new countries a year, and maybe revisit 1-2 old ones. This year I ended up in Greece, Ukraine, Poland, Italy, Denmark, the UK (Scotland being new for me), the 5 ‘Stans, Iraqi Kurdistan, Azerbaijan, UAE, and Nepal – 15 total, all but Italy and the UAE were new for me. I will be the first to admit that I didn’t spend as much time as I could/should have, but having had a taste, I know which ones I’d like to revisit – Kyrgyzstan (for landscape photography), Kazakhstan (for the old Soviet legacy there), Iraq (but the Arab part this time), and Nepal (for everything outside of Kathmandu).

    2020 will definitely be more low-key, although I have a trip planned to Egypt and Sudan in February, with a few days in Paris on either side since that’s where I’ll be flying into (hopefully the strikes will be over/less frequent by then). Then back home to Canada in the summer for a family reunion. I may head over to the east coast and visit Newfoundland and/or Nova Scotia, since I’ve never been to that part of the country (I always try to go somewhere new when going home). Then to York (UK) for a conference in September. I’m tempted to go to Iran after the conference, but I have to wait for my work schedule to see if it’s feasible. Iran right now is at the top of my bucket list (and has been for some time) but I haven’t had luck in finding the right time to visit for at least 2-3 weeks. I don’t usually travel over the Christmas holidays, but I like the idea of visiting Christmas Island at Christmas, so that may be option too. Just too many choices!

    Liked by 1 person

    December 21, 2019 at 12:57 pm

  2. Hi Rachelle, sorry, I did read this but forgot to reply. I shared your joy at discovering Kyrgyzstan and shall be on your ear for recommendations for Tajikistan in due course. I think I might put Azerbaijan back on the list since Edison has eaten the problematic passport so with new number and new document I can visit sooner than expected. Wherever you end up, I shall enjoy following your travels. Happy New Year!

    Like

    December 30, 2019 at 12:29 pm

  3. Pingback: How to deal with travel indecision | Julia's Travels

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